YOU CAN LISTEN TO THIS FLIGHT SIMULATION GROUP LECTURE BELOW, VISIT THE SOCIETY'S 'SOUNDCLOUD', OR SUBSCRIBE FOR FREE ON ITUNES

Does simulator training make a good aeroplane, or vice versa? It’s a bit like the chicken or the egg dilemma - which comes first? In today’s world of high-fidelity simulators, it is feasible that the first time newly trained pilots fly a transport aeroplane, they will be carrying passengers in revenue service. Training and certification can be accomplished entirely in a simulator, which emphasises how realistic those simulators can be.

This lecture will review the use of simulation during the early development of the 787, and then show how the flight testing contributed to the final development of the 787 training simulators.

About the speaker:

Capt Randall Neville, 787 Chief Test Pilot, The Boeing Company

Randy Neville is currently the Chief Pilot for the 787 in Boeing’s Flight Test organisation in Seattle, Washington. Randy flew on the first flights of both the 787-8 and the 787-9 and conducts the gamut of flight test involved with FAA certification of commercial transports, including propulsion, performance, flutter, handling qualities, flight controls, avionics and subsystem tests. He also conducts support for the flight test in the T-33 and T-38, flying those aircraft as target or chase for various military and commercial programmes.

Prior to this, he was a test pilot in Boeing’s military division. In 2005 he was awarded the Society of Experimental Pilot’s Kinchloe Award for an F-22 flight test event in which he unexpectedly sustained over 11 negative G’s.

Prior to joining Boeing, Randy flew for 20 years in the US Air Force, retiring as Lt Col in 1996. He has over 8000 hours flying time and has flown over 75 different types of aircraft.

Conferences and Events
04 June 2014